On building the ShelterBox brand

sb_fam_image_01
sbx_1_668x668-01
sbx_1_668x668-02
sbx_1_668x668-03
sb_fam_image_02
sb_fam_image_03
sb_fam_image_04
‘No Family Without Shelter’: a brave, new brand for ShelterBox

In only their 14th year, ShelterBox – the plucky charity from Cornwall with the iconic green boxes – had already cemented their reputation as a leading international disaster relief organisation.

Trouble was, their brand was behind the times. It was time for ShelterBox to catch up, to reflect the incredible work they were doing around the world. But the organisation was sensibly cautious of spending donors’ money on a rebrand – how, they asked, could they use this rebrand to help increase their income?

We started by learning

ShelterBox already had a solid donor base, especially in the South West of England, which gave us the perfect start. We held audience interviews to get to know the people closest to the brand, and find out what motivated (and de-motivated) them.

Then we uncovered what drives the organisation

We took our findings to a two-day, intensive brand workshop where we looked at brand archetypes, personalities and more, trying to discover ShelterBox’s unique truths.

Over the two days, we settled on the mood that seemed to drive the organisation: impatience.

We played with this idea, bending it, twisting it, trying to drill into the heart of ShelterBox as an organisation, before using this theme to devise their new brand proposition: No Family Without Shelter.

The outcomes

Ideas came pouring out, and from these we created the Pledge of Impatience, a direct mail piece that rallied supporters to sign their names next to ShelterBox’s new commitment.

The new brand helped ShelterBox to align their communications across every channel. We worked with ShelterBox’s digital agency to reflect the new brand in an updated website, while we set to work rolling it out in direct mail and print advertising.

The case for ShelterBox’s investment was proven within just three months. More than 3,000 new supporters were accrued, while average gifts hit highs of £158. We even received one-off gifts as large as £25,000. Digital conversion rates increased too, far beyond the industry average.


28th November 2016

Date

Branding, Digital, Direct Mail

Category